CAPITAL COERCION AND CRIME BOSSISM IN THE PHILIPPINES PDF

Philippines. Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines, by. John T. Sidel. California: Stanford University Press, xii + US$, cloth. Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines, by John T. Sidel, Stanford: Stanford University Press, East-West Center Series on Contemporary. Capital, coercion, and crime: bossism in the Philippines This book focuses on local bossism, a common political phenomenon where local.

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The DistrictLevel Dynasties of Cebu. The author, by contrast, argues that the roots of bossism in the Philippines lie in the inauguration of formal democratic institutions at a relatively early stage of capitalist development. References to this book Everyday Politics in the Philippines: Contents Bossism and State Formation.

Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index. Similarly, in early postindependence Indonesia, [ Probing beneath the superficialities of election rituals, Sidel discovers the dynamics of a political-economic process of systemic coercion and corruption that may trouble the democratic transition in many newer nations and regies for decades to come.

Capital, Coercion, and Crime. But, seen from a comparative perspective, it is clear that electoral democracy and bossism go hand-in-hand. This essentially means that elected officials acquired broad discretionary powers over all local resources law enforcement, taxes, local appointments, etc.

Indeed, the idea that voters support bosses mainly because of their charisma and noblesse jn is ridiculous when we face the stark reality of boss violence. Cpercion acknowledging the local cultural context in which a state apparatus operates, the explanatory power of any political theory will be severely limited. This leads him, unfortunately, to dismiss altogether the explanatory relevance of culture — an issue I address further below.

Of course, whether or not any election is legitimate or truly democratic is debatable.

Capital, coercion, and crime : bossism in the Philippines in SearchWorks catalog

Examples of bossism include Old Corruption in eighteenth-century England, urban political machines in the United States, caciques in Latin America, the Mafia in Southern Italy, and today’s gangster politicians in such countries as India, Russia, and Thailand. The book elaborates these arguments through case studies of bosses in two Philippine provinces, Cavite and Cebu.

Poverty and insecurity leave many voters vulnerable to clientelist, coercive, and financial pressure, and the state’s central role in capital accumulation provides the basis for local bosses’ economic empires and political machines. Yet writings on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion in shaping electoral competition and social relations.

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The small-town dynasties of Cebu– 5.

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From the Philippine examples, we see that even seemingly untouchable bosses will fall though sometimes only temporarily when they lose an election.

This brings us back to the problem of ignoring the cultural context within which political events take place.

The author, by contrast, argues that the roots of bossism in the Philippines lie in the inauguration of formal democratic institutions at a relatively early stage dapital capitalist development. Physical description p. This dependency, in turn, ensures that the Philippines will never rise above this post-colonial mire for as long as bossism remains entrenched.

cdime User Review – Flag as inappropriate Politacal Milestone. Review “This book is certainly a contribution to the literature on Philippine politics, comparative politics, and state-society relations. This book focuses on local bossism, a common political phenomenon where local power brokers achieve monopolistic control over an area’s coercive and economic resources.

The contrast between single-generation gangster politicians in Cavite and enduring commercial dynasties in Cebu reveals variation in the forms of bossism that reflect variations in the local political economies of the two provinces. The author argues that the roots of bossism in the Philippines lie in the inauguration of formal democratic institutions at a relatively early stage of capitalist development. The contrast between single-generation gangster politicians in Cavite and enduring commercial dynasties in Cebu reveals variation in the forms of bossism that reflect variations in the local political cwpital of the two provinces.

Yet captial on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion tthe shaping electoral competition and social relations.

No doubt we are shown only the tip of the iceberg, as a detailed pathology of any one of these provincial and small-town bosses would fill volumes.

Portrayals of a “weak state” captured by a landed oligarchy have similarly neglected philippinws enduring institutional legacies of American colonial rule and the importance of state resources for the accumulation of wealth and power in the Philippines. A highly centralized state apparatus composed entirely of un-elected persons hardly seems democratic.

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For many years, the entrenchment of numerous provincial warlords and political clans has made the Philippines a striking case of local bossism. For many years, the entrenchment philippinfs numerous provincial warlords and political clans has made the Philippines a striking case of local bossism.

Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines – John Thayer Sidel – Google Books

Local bossism flourished in Burma during the early postindependence period of parliamentary rule, but faded at least in Burma proper with the imposition of centralized military rule in However, with the demise of parliamentary rule and the onset of martial law inand the inception of military rule ina centralized bureaucratic state emerged to subordinate local aristocracies, magnates, and gangsters alike [ Browse related items Start at call number: It provides a comparative historical analysis of bossism, drawing conclusions of great interest not only to scholars of Southeast Asia but to students of comparative politics as well.

ISBN Full text not available from this repository. Capital, coercion, and crime: However, Filipino voters, with their indigenous cultural constructs, remain the most important locus for change, as it is they who must evaluate and deconstruct this state apparatus in order to effectively contradict, destabilize, and subvert the institution of bossism.

Vulgar displays of power e. Although an electoral democracy allows bossism to fester, it can also be its downfall. In fact, when bossism in other countries is considered, the key culprit seems to be, not a particular structural flaw in the development of national institutions, but electoral democracy itself.

In sum, Capital, Coercion, and Crime provides a comparative historical analysis of bossism, drawing conclusions of great interest not only to scholars of Southeast Asia but to students of comparative politics as well. Secret Trades, Porous Borders: The book elaborates these arguments through case studies of bosses in two Philippine provinces, Cavite and Cebu. Moreover, bossism is found throughout the world and in modern history. My library Help Advanced Book Search.